Reacting To Negative Reviews

People tend to allow their preconceived notions to define their experience. If a customer visits a restaurant for the first time, she will probably not be a blank slate. Her friends have told her about it and testified that the pasta was very good. But, they might add, the customer service leaves something to be desired. Then she will actively look for mistakes that the waitress made to confirm her assumptions. When she finds that mistake, she will agree that the customer service is bad. That is the power of a rumor. But in this article, Oregon Business pointed out that negative reviews are just part of life. One of the fundamental aspects of online reputation management is in how the business reacts to it.

People Are Watching

Think of the tactics that children will sometimes use. They will misbehave to get the attention of their parents. Similarly, a bully might say something offensive to get the other guy to overreact and make a scene. In this case, the person who overreacts will be perceived as guilty, while the bully will just laugh it off and say that he was joking around. In the same way, when if you overreact to a negative article, people are going to see your bad behavior. That will either confirm the suspicions arouse by the negative article or reflect worse on you than those suspicions.

Treat Negative Reviews As An Opportunity

An article on onlinereputationreviews.com says that the wise entrepreneur is one who thrives on negative reviews. She will take them as a form of constructive criticism. Dissatisfied customers are customers who were expecting better service or a better product. If you have a large number of negative reviews, then this could serve to help the company. You could identify the most prevalent complaints and then adjust those areas of service. In the future, you can emphasize that feature so that consumers will recognize that the problem has been addressed or the complaints were not true.

Negative reviews can be difficult. But everyone gets them; whether it is from your step-parents over the dinner table or from a critical client on the Internet.